Skip links and keyboard navigation

Paths for walking

Footpaths in road reservations

While a footpath necessarily follows the natural topography of the area, in the best possible circumstances a continuous accessible path of travel along a footpath should:

  • have a gradient of no steeper than 1 in 20
  • have a cross fall of no steeper than 1 in 40
  • have kerb cuts with appropriate kerb ramps
  • incorporate appropriate Tactile Ground Surface Indicators where necessary to ensure adequate safety and orientation at street crossings
  • have a pedestrian zone with a minimum clear width of 1.8 metres at the narrowest point and a minimum clear height of 2m with nothing encroaching into that envelope
  • be as smooth as possible without raised or cracked paving or tree root damage
  • have a slip resistant surface during dry and wet conditions.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Shared paths

Where people walking and cycling are moving at speed and sharing space it is considered that a 1m width should be used as the basis of the design envelope for each person walking or riding.

This means a 3m wide pathway would allow two people to walk side by side and a bicycle rider to pass with adequate operating space and clearance.

In Queensland, people on bicycles are allowed to ride on any footpath unless specifically prohibited by signage and local laws.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Walking tracks and trails

Track design should match the intended purpose and the types of walkers likely to use the facility.

Key issues include providing access and controlling the impact of users.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

  • Great Walks (Department of Environment and Science, 2020)

Pedestrian bridges

Bridges across barriers such as waterways, railway lines and major roads can improve walking access to local facilities and reduce walking distances and times.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Last updated
31 August 2021