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Planning for walking

Pedestrian network characteristics

Networks should be:

  • accessible
  • connected
  • legible
  • comfortable
  • convenient
  • pleasant
  • safe
  • secure
  • universal.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Developing walking network plans

Walking network plans can be developed at varying scales, depending on:

  • the whole Local Government Area (LGA)
  • the Central Business District(s)
  • a selection of centres/towns
  • specific areas/precincts within centres/towns e.g. around a school or public transport node.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Mapping walkable catchments (‘ped sheds’)

A walkable catchment (also known as a ‘ped shed’) analysis is a tool to assess the walkability of a neighbourhood.

They can be used to assess street layouts for new developments or existing areas, to consider improvements which can be made to connectivity. They can also be used to compare locations for walkability and connectiveness.

A walkable catchment analysis typically compares the theoretical versus actual walkable catchment within 5 minutes (400m) or 10 minutes (800m) walk from a destination, however, catchments up to 20 minutes’ walk may also be used if appropriate.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Prioritising walking infrastructure

Once walking route audits have been completed, potential projects should be listed and prioritised. A cost estimate should also be determined as part of the prioritisation process.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Walking strategies and local action plans

The Queensland Walking Strategy 2019-2029 shares a vision and objectives for walking in Queensland.

The International Charter for Walking shares a vision and actions based around the following strategic principles:

(1) Increased inclusive mobility
(2) Well designed and managed spaces and places for people
(3) Improved integration of networks
(4) Supportive land-use and spatial planning
(5) Reduced road danger
(6) Less crime and fear of crime
(7) More supportive authorities
(8) A culture of walking.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Pedestrian demand forecasting

Techniques include:

  • similar conditions study
  • aggregate behaviour
  • sketch plan
  • discrete choice
  • travel models.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Accessing public transport

Walking is the preferred and most important mode of access to the TransLink network.

For assessing walkable catchments around high-capacity public transport nodes, it is recommended that a ten-minute walking distance is used (800 metre radius from the node).

TMR endorsed guidance

Community engagement – for developing local plans and strategies

Methods to seek input from the community include:

  • existing feedback to council
  • focus groups
  • street intercept surveys
  • phone surveys
  • school surveys and audits
  • walking audits
  • community groups
  • crowd sourcing software.

TMR endorsed guidance

Other useful resources

Funding

Funding for walking infrastructure and initiatives include:

  • local government budget dedicated to walking infrastructure
  • incorporating walking infrastructure into other works programs e.g. road/public transport infrastructure projects, maintenance programs, open space or recreation projects, urban renewal programs
  • state and federal government grants.

TMR grant schemes

Other useful resources

Last updated
31 August 2021